According to the chief physician of Moderna, the results of vaccination trials only show that they prevent serious human illness – not necessarily that the recipients are still unable to transmit the virus.


Laboratory specialist Sendy Puerto will process blood samples from participants in the Moderna Coronavirus Vaccine Clinical Trial on September 2, 2020 in Miami, Florida. Taimy Alvarez / AP
  • Tal Zaks, the chief physician of the modern officer, told Axios that the public should not “overinterpret” the results of the vaccination experiment to assume that life can return to normal after vaccinating adults.

  • “They do not show that they would be prevented from temporarily carrying this virus and infecting others,” Zaks said. He told Axios.

  • Although science believes that the vaccine is likely to prevent its transmission, he said there is still no solid evidence for this.

  • “I think it’s important that we don’t change behavior just by vaccination,” he said.

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Tal Zaks, the chief physician of the modern officer, told Axios that the public should not “overinterpret” the results of the vaccination experiment to assume that life can return to normal after vaccinating adults.

Zaks warned that the test results show that the vaccine can prevent someone from getting sick or “seriously ill” – as Zaks puts it – from COVID-19, but the results do not show that the vaccine prevents the virus from spreading.

“They do not show that they would be prevented from temporarily carrying this virus and infecting others,” Zaks said. said in an interview with Axios on the outlet’s HBO show.

Zaks added, “When we start introducing this vaccine, we won’t have enough specific data to show that this vaccine reduces the rate of transmission.”

Although science believes it is likely that the vaccine will prevent its transmission, there is still no solid evidence for this.

“I think it’s important that we don’t change behavior just by vaccination,” he said.

The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine was one of three vaccines that showed efficacy in the study results. According to the company, vaccination is 94.5% effective in protecting people against COVID-19.

Moncef Slaoui, leader of Warp Speed, the White House’s vaccine development and administration efforts, said on Sunday that the company is requesting emergency approval from the Food and Drug Administration for the COVID-19 vaccine by the end of November.

Pfizer, who made another vaccine, applied for an FDA emergency permit on Friday.

On Monday, AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford also reported that their vaccine is effective against COVID-19.

According to Johns Hopkins University, there have been at least 12.4 million infections in the United States to date, with more than 257,000 deaths. Daily cases in the U.S. reached record highs several times in the weeks before Thanksgiving, and many state experts have warned it could be the deadliest wave of the virus in the United States.

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