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After the Alabama Tornado, look for the missing sequel and recovery: NPR


The first respondents are on a weekend day in Beauregard, Ala, a neighborhood severely damaged by a tornado. The number of deaths from the storm is 23, and the number of victims is between 6 and 93 years.

David Goldman / AP


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David Goldman / AP

The first respondents are on a weekend day in Beauregard, Ala, a neighborhood severely damaged by a tornado. The number of deaths from the storm is 23, and the number of victims is between 6 and 93 years.

David Goldman / AP

In Lee County, Ala, the teams are looking for seven or eight people who are still missing after an extremely strong tornado that passed through the area on Sunday afternoon.

The number of deaths from the storm was 23, and the number was 6-93. They all identified and informed their families about the coroner. One of the families living in marriage and two houses living on the same road lost seven members.

"Just keep these families in your prayers," said Lee County Coroner, Bill Harris. – It's a tragic situation.

Opelika, Ala., Fire Chief Byron Prather said the troops would continue to search until needed to stay out of anyone. "We are still looking for some searches in the area, looking for debris where people or animals can be … So we didn't give up hope. We're still looking."

Officials say they can hope to move from search and rescue to recovery status on Tuesday. Jay Jones Lee County Sheriff said they had narrowed their search areas and the number of missing people dropped significantly. He said that heavy equipment raises a large amount of debris, and some areas are still limited to first respondents and search teams.

John De Block, a meteorologist at the Birmingham National Weather Service, described the way to the tornado near WBMM NPR member state: "The tornado soon hit the Macon County / Lee County after 2 hours. sailed south, Smiths station north, "before crossing to Georgia. The wind speed was up to 165 miles / hour, he said.

When the tornado touched, Lee County resident Johnny Washington fell asleep and told WBHM. She was looking for shelter under the bed. "After waking up and seeing this morning, I'm shocked, I'm still here," he said.

Chris Darden meteorologist at the Birmingham National Weather Service. On Monday, the damage assessment said the loss of life was unfortunate – but this huge tornado was almost inevitable.

"You know that throwing 170 miles of centrifuges into brick waste by 2," said NPR to Russell Lewis. – We all spear. All killer machines.

But for the survivors, the effort is now beginning to pick up the pieces. Residents said they could start debris from their properties to the edge of the road to pick it up.

Patricia Moore lives in Beauregard, south of Opel. "I don't know that I just think that God is really trying to gather people and seeing this is what has just looked around for everyone who is helping each other," WBHM said. "It's amazing."

Jones Sheriff was also optimistic in the future. "This is a very tightly connected community," he told reporters. "These people are tough, flexible people. And they knocked them down, but they come back."

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