McConnell seems to accept his election victory over Biden Trump


  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday first seemed to accept President Joe Biden’s victory over President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election.
  • “I think we all know that after the first day of the year, there will probably be a debate about some additional size packages next year, depending on what the new administration wants to pursue,” McConnell said.
  • McConnell had previously withheld recognition of Biden’s victory, arguing instead that Trump was entitled to legal challenges.
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday first referred to President Joe Biden’s victory over President Donald Trump in the 2020 election.

The Kentucky Republican, who worked closely with the Trump White House to deploy a large number of conservative judges to the federal bench, spoke of a “new administration” when he discussed COVID-19’s stimulus talks.

McConnell’s statement was the closest he understood Trump’s loss.

“I think we all know that after the first day of the year, there will probably be a discussion about some additional size packages next year, depending on what the new administration wants to pursue,” he said.

On November 9, even though almost every major news organization predicted that Biden would win the election, McConnell supported Trump’s legal challenges against the election results and refused to recognize the elected president as the winner.

“Obviously, not a single state has verified its election results,” McConnell said at the time. “We have at least one or two states that are already well on their way to recounting, and I think the president could have legal challenges in at least five states.”

Georgia has since completed its nationwide control and Wisconsin has undergone a partial recount, and both results have confirmed Biden’s victory in the states.

While McConnell had a turbulent relationship with former President Barack Obama, he has a long history with Bidend.

Biden was a senator in Delaware from 1973 to 2009, and McConnell has served on the senate since 1985. Their tenure overlapped at a time when the Senate enjoyed a more club-like atmosphere and was remarkably less partisan than it is today.

But the couple’s relationship will be tested by a tightly divided Senate and two January Senate election tests that will determine which party controls the Senate.