The death of COVID-19 exceeds 3,500; the mortality rate is rising again


MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin has suffered 3,500 deaths from COVID-19 in a State Department of Health report Wednesday. DHS recorded 82 more deaths, the fourth-largest loss this month. The state is losing an average of 46 people a day due to COVID-19, and the mortality rate has risen back to 0.89%, the rate last seen on November 1st.

Deaths have been reported: Chippewa, Clark, Dane (21), Douglas, Eau Claire, Forest, Jackson, Kenosha (3), La Crosse, Lincoln, Marathon (2), Marinette, Milwaukee (10), Outagamie (3), Pierce , Polk (6), Racine (8), Rock (3), Sauk, Shawano (2), Sheboygan, Trempealeau (5), Waukesha (7), Winnebago and Wood counties. The death toll has been adjusted downwards in Brown and Richland counties.

Based on 3,977 tests, the state identified 3,777 new cases of coronavirus in the new report – a positivity rate of 37.83%. The 7-day average of new cases has dropped to 3,664 per day, but it should be mentioned that the state has received less than 10,000 test results in the last 7 days due to the festive holiday of Thanksgiving, when many test sites were closed. At least 1 new case was reported in each Wisconsin county, which has been common for more than a month.

The 7-day average of the positivity rate is up to 35.66%. Medical experts say it should be below 5% to detect treatment for the virus, and we haven’t seen it as low since late June.

County cases and deaths are listed later in this article. DHS has also released a new interactive map on the Internet that shows cases and deaths of the COVID-19 virus by county, municipality, zip code, or tank district. CLICK HERE. You can view cases and deaths by total number or per person or deaths as a percentage of all cases. Andrea Palm, a health ministerial candidate, said it “offers new ways for people to understand the workings of COVID-19 within their community”.

According to the state, 359,090 people had a positive result for the coronavirus. Wisconsin is likely to exceed 400,000 cases tomorrow or Friday – 300,000 after less than 3 weeks. This equates to 6.9% of the state’s population. It’s been ten months since Wisconsin’s first COVID-19 case.

The proportion of active cases fell again to 16.7%. According to the state, 65,926 people have been diagnosed in the past 30 days and have not been treated. Another 325,587 exceeded this time limit.

Symptoms of COVID-19 may occur 14 days after exposure if the person infected with the coronavirus shows any symptoms at all. Governor Evers encouraged Wisconsinite residents to be more careful about wearing a mask and maintaining physical distance from people other than their household. “It shows the people you go beyond that you care about them.”

Prevea Health President / CEO Dr. Ashok Rai said the health community is having a lot of concern about the coronavirus during the Thanksgiving break during trips and family gatherings, and the state will see the effects until Thursday, leaving time for symptoms to appear. and return the test results. “People from Thanksgiving who didn’t do the right things if they turn in a positive direction are likely to start seeing them this Thursday. But we don’t know who was infected along the way, so our numbers will continue to grow during this period. That was the concern: the wave in addition to the surge.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

In the past 24 hours, an additional 197 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19, reducing this figure from a record 277 hospitalizations the previous day. It also reduced the seven-day average from 166 to 159 per day. To date, 17,569 people have required hospitalization for COVID-19 since February, stable at 4.4% of all known coronavirus cases.

We get fresh hospital numbers later in the afternoon on Wednesday, but on Tuesday, 1,277 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized, 415 in the intensive care unit, according to the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA). Changes in hospital number take into account deaths and discharges.

Hospitals in the Fox Valley region treat 103 COVID-19 patients, more than a quarter (26) of whom are in the intensive care unit. Hospitals in the Northeast region provide 171 COVID-19 hospitals, 45 in the intensive care unit.

Eight patients were in the alternative care institution on Wednesday at the state fairgrounds. The purpose of the on-site hospital is to facilitate the release of hospital beds by bringing in patients who are close to being discharged from the hospital but are not yet ready, such as those who are outpatient but still need oxygen.

Hospital emergency

The WHA reports that 170 ICU beds are open among 134 hospitals in the state, indicating that 88.4% of the state’s ICU beds are occupied – including COVID-19 patients and other diseases or conditions. In total, the state has 1,603 medical beds (14.3%) if it has staff to care for the patients in them.

Fox Valley’s 13 hospitals in 8 counties have only 4 intensive beds (3.8%) and the intermediate nursing bed is not open. Overall, 94 out of 853 beds are open (11%).

In 10 hospitals in the Northeast region serving 7 counties, 8 ICU beds (3.9%) and 4 mid-level nursing beds are open. In total, 148 of the 956 beds in hospitals are open (15.5%).

WEDNESDAY COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are listed in brave.) *

Wisconsin *

  • Adams – 1071 cases (+6) (7 deaths)
  • Ashland – 697 cases (+17) (9 deaths)
  • Barron – 3688 cases (+38) (41 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 698 cases (+13) (14 deaths)
  • Brown – 22,857 cases (+130) (139 deaths) (deaths modified by the state in -1)
  • Buffalo – 828 cases (+9) (4 deaths)
  • Burnett – 790 cases (+10) (13 deaths)
  • Calumet – 4086 cases (+16) (26 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 4921 cases (+127) (53 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 2215 cases (+42) (42 deaths) (+1)
  • Columbia – 3531 cases (+33) (12 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1318 cases (+4) (8 deaths)
  • Denmark – 27,830 cases (+230) (102 deaths) (+21)
  • Dodge – 8,457 cases (+49) (74 deaths)
  • Door – 1612 cases (+11) (11 deaths)
  • Douglas – 2138 cases (+26) (6 deaths) (+1)
  • Dunn – 2863 cases (+34) (13 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 7,909 cases (+55) (59 deaths) (+1)
  • Florence – 333 cases (+6) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 8569 cases (+76) (50 deaths)
  • Forest – 733 cases (+2) (18 deaths) (+1)
  • Support – 3528 cases (+29) (64 deaths)
  • Green – 1739 cases (+41) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 1192 cases (+7) (6 deaths)
  • Iowa – 1,315 cases (+9) (5 deaths)
  • Vas – 363 tokens (+3) (10 deaths)
  • Jackson – 1755 cases (+17) (5 deaths) (+1)
  • Jefferson – 5426 cases (+23) (39 deaths)
  • Juneau – 1937 cases (+7) (7 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 9,710 cases (+174) (153 deaths) (+3)
  • Kewaunee – 1713 cases (+7) (17 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 8,209 cases (+83) (37 deaths) (+1)
  • Lafayette – 1095 cases (+1) (4 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,558 cases (+13) (29 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 1,986 cases (+11) (30 deaths) (+1)
  • Manitowoc – 4980 cases (+38) (37 deaths)
  • Marathon – 9,926 cases (+115) (126 deaths) (+2)
  • Marinette – 3012 cases (+27) (29 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1032 cases (+4) (15 deaths)
  • Menominee – 570 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 69,786 (+743) (756 deaths) (+10)
  • Monroe – 2683 cases (+34) (14 deaths)
  • Oconto – 3177 cases (+16) (28 deaths)
  • Oneida – 2346 cases (+19) (34 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 13,854 cases (+79) (133 deaths) (+3)
  • Ozaukee – 4891 cases (+78) (36 deaths)
  • Pepin – 497 cases (+16) (2 deaths)
  • Pierce – 2,204 cases (+27) (19 deaths) (+1)
  • Polk – 2236 cases (+20) (15 deaths) (+6)
  • Portage – 4770 cases (+58) (37 deaths)
  • Price – 751 cases (+19) (4 deaths)
  • Racine – 14,288 cases (+101) (177 deaths) (+8)
  • Richland – 891 cases (+6) (13 deaths) (deaths modified by the state in -1)
  • Rock – 9,553 cases (+60) (90 deaths) (+3)
  • Rusk – 904 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Sauk – 3637 cases (+24) (19 deaths) (+1)
  • Sawyer – 921 cases (+5) (7 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3723 cases (+16) (50 deaths) (+2)
  • Sheboygan – 9254 cases (+72) (62 deaths) (+1)
  • St. Croix – 4417 cases (+29) (21 deaths)
  • Taylor – 1222 cases (+17) (10 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 2451 cases (+39) (22 deaths) (+5)
  • Vernon – 1171 cases (+11) (12 deaths)
  • Vilas – 1,287 cases (+21) (13 deaths)
  • Walworth – 6127 cases (+46) (53 deaths)
  • Washburn – 726 cases (+8) (5 deaths)
  • Washington – 9,059 cases (+154) (72 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 26,945 cases (+272) (210 deaths) (+7)
  • Waupaca – 3715 cases (+14) (86 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1758 cases (+3) (10 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 13,285 cases (+89) (117 deaths) (+1)
  • Fa – 4371 case (+115) (29 deaths) (+1)

Upper Michigan Peninsula **

  • Algeria – 159 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga – 419 cases (+5) (23 deaths) (+2)
  • Chippewa – 369 cases (+6) (6 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,256 cases (+28) (51 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson – 1709 cases (+44) (39 deaths) (deaths modified by the state in -1)
  • Gogebic – 597 cases (+13) (11 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1289 cases (+12) (11 deaths)
  • Vas – 701 tokens (+8) (29 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 57 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 118 cases
  • Mackinac – 220 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Marquette – 2650 cases (+22) (30 deaths)
  • Menominee – 1241 cases (+24) (18 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 256 cases (+4) (13 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 164 cases (1 death)

* Viewers asked us why the state number is different from what was reported on some sites in the county health department. DHS will report the case to all health departments within the county, including tribal, municipal, and county health departments; county websites do not. In addition, public health departments update their data at different times, while DHS freezes the numbers it receives for the same time each day to compile the afternoon report.

DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their deaths. Most people severely affected by the coronavirus have diseases or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, or obesity, that increase a person’s risk of death from COVID-19 but would have lived longer if not because of their infection. After further review, the state may review cases and deaths, such as the victim’s whereabouts, make copies of records, or correct laboratory results. Details can be found on the DHS website and in the Frequently Asked Questions.

** State of Michigan does not update Sunday numbers. Monday’s figures include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

See the full DHS information below.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with cold shaking
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or odor

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new or “novel” virus. No one has natural immunity to it. Children and teenagers seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with a medical condition (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered a high risk according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed among people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To prevent the virus from spreading:
  • Keep at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with patients or apparently patients
  • Stay home as much as possible
  • Delete events and avoid groups, gatherings, game days, and unimportant appointments
  • Stay at home if you are ill unless you receive medical attention
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At the very least, use a cloth if you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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