The Supreme Court is temporarily winning over California churches because of the restrictions of the coronavirus


The Supreme Court has given a positive signal to a church in California that has restricted the number of people admitted to houses of worship by Governor Gavin Newsom due to the coronavirus epidemic.

In Thursday’s order, the court released the District Court’s ruling against Harvest Rock Church with an order to review their challenge in light of the Supreme Court’s recent refusal to restrict New York’s prayer services.

CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWNS BY STATE: What you need to know

“The order of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California on September 2 is blank and the case will be referred to the U.S. Court of Appeals for Ninth Circuit with an order to be referred to the District Court for further consideration in light of: Brooklyn Roman Catholic diocese v. Cuomo, “the Supreme Court said.

Fox News contacted Newsom’s office for a comment, but did not respond immediately.

In its 5-4 judgment, the Supreme Court ruled against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and the American Jewish group Agudath Israel and issued an order against restrictions in New York that limited the prayer houses of prayer in some areas to ten people. 25 and in others. Religious organizations argued that Governor Andrew Cuomo’s policy was stricter against houses of worship than against secular facilities.

KENTUCKY AG MAINTAINS STATE CROWN VIRUS RESTRICTIONS TO DIFFER FROM THE COURT TO OPEN RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS

California has a multi-level system that imposes different levels of restrictions on different counties, but as of Nov. 21, the state’s 41 counties — representing 94 percent of the state’s population — have the strictest regulations that include a ban on all states. indoor religious services. Services in other counties severely limit the number of people allowed. The state issued special guidelines for places of worship earlier this year.

The legal argument of the Church is based primarily on the First Amendment. Under the free exercise clause of the amendment, the church argues that the Newsom order is illegal because it limits the size of religious gatherings while treating non-religious groups and activities differently.

CLICK HERE to receive Fox News news

The church also cites the case law on the founding clause of the First Amendment, according to which the government cannot “force or influence a person to go to church or stay away from it against his will”. The church argues that imposing criminal sanctions on people who go to the house of prayer influences them to stay away.