Trump Attorneys Claim Arizona Election Fraud Conspiracy at GOP ‘Hearing’


President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, urged Arizona state lawmakers to delve deep into the alleged voter fraud conspiracy during Monday’s “hearing,” the same day the state confirmed the election of elected Democratic president Joe Biden.

“He had a number of situations with his employees, his citizens, and he observed polling officials who helped people vote to tell who to vote for,” Giuliani said. “The poll staff observed whether they were exchanging votes, making ambiguous votes, and making sure they were cast for Biden.”

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Giuliani interrogated retired Colonel Phil Waldron, who introduced himself as a cyber security expert during the meeting, which was attended by Arizona state lawmakers and Paul Gosar MP, R-Ariz. Waldron Giuliani also reported on election fraud to lawmakers in the state of Pennsylvania last week.

Supporters of President Donald Trump protest in front of a local hotel where Arizona Republicans have scheduled a meeting

Supporters of President Donald Trump are protesting in front of a local hotel where Arizona Republicans have scheduled a “fact-finding hearing” to discuss the election, with members of Trump’s legal team and Arizona lawmakers on Monday, November 30, 2020. In Phoenix. (AP photo / Ross D. Franklin)

Waldron warned of potential voter fraud in Maricopa and Pima counties, Arizona’s two most populous counties, and said Dominion’s voting machines were vulnerable to hackers or on-site manipulation.

Waldron claimed a county official in Maricopa said the county had not validated signatures on certain ballot papers, creating a “1.9 million vote fraud potential.” This official made no statement, he said. Waldron also claimed that the Pima County witness said the votes were “embedded” in various districts in order to achieve the Biden victory.

“What I take from your testimony, Colonel, is that every Democratic candidate in Pima County has embedded 35,000 votes, this gentleman was asserted, who did not give us a statement,” Giuliani said. “We don’t know if the gentleman is telling the truth.”

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So far, courts, as well as state and local election officials, have found no evidence of widespread voter fraud that would be sufficient to overthrow the election results. Biden ended up bearing the state with just over 10,000 votes, or one-tenth of one percent of the vote. Eleven voter votes were captured in Arizona.

The rule used by several states has repressed such claims.

Dominion spokesman Michael Steel has previously refuted the claim that there is a risk of a change in the votes cast through the company’s systems. He says it is physically impossible to change the votes in the system.

“Look, when a voter votes on a Dominion machine, they fill out a ballot paper on a touch screen. They get a hard copy, which is then given to a local election official for safekeeping. If any electronic interference has taken place, the electronically reported data does not match the printed ballot papers. in the case where we examined – in Georgia, throughout the country, the level of security of the printed ballot paper, the elections, corresponded to the electronic invoice. “

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Trump’s defeat in Arizona — as the margin exceeded one-tenth of a percent — does not qualify for automatic recalculation. While there is no provision in the state for a losing candidate to request a recount, Kelli Ward, the Arizona Republican party president, has indicated that the citizen will challenge the results after the certification.

Amid the ongoing legal battle, the incoming Biden administration has been reassured by the U.S. General Services Directorate as the apparent winner of the election, giving the green light to progress in the interim process.

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Fox News Edmund DeMarche, Paul Steinhauser and Ronn Blitzer, as well as the Associated Press, contributed to the report.